Student Outcomes

 

STUDENT OUTCOMES
 
1. Student Outcomes:
 
Based on the Program Educational Objectives specified above, the faculty has agreed upon a set of desired Student Outcomes, which are the same as the ABET Student Outcomes, the attainment of which helps prepare alumni for the successful achievement of the Program Objectives.
 
Student Outcomes: Chemical Engineering students who complete the curriculum will have to attain at the time of graduation:
 
a)      an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering (Science/Math)
b)      an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data (Experiments)
c)      an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability (Design)
d)     an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams (Team)
e)      an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems (Problems)
f)       an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility (Ethics)
g)      an ability to communicate effectively (Communication)
h)      the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context (Global)
i)        a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning (Learning)
j)        a knowledge of contemporary issues (Contemporary)
k)      an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. (Tools)
 
Our Objectives state simply that the program will prepare graduates to obtain employment or attend graduate school, allowing them to advance in their chosen careers, and be productive and fulfilled professionals throughout their careers. Clearly, the Student Outcomes listed above embody the education, skills and abilities that the Department deems necessary to achieve these career objectives. Specifically, we break the Student Outcomes into two types:
"Technical” Skills and Abilities: Outcomes a) – e)
"Professional” Skills and Abilities: Outcomes f) – k).
 
The “Technical” Skills and Abilities are those traditionally targeted and taught within a Chemical Engineering curriculum. The "Professional” Skills and Abilities are equally important but the level of attainment of these skills will manifest itself at different points in a graduate’s career. Also, specific educational tools relevant to attainment of specific professional skills and abilities tend to be spread throughout the curriculum and are not the key component of any single course or group of courses.
 
 
 
 
2. Relationship of Student Outcomes to Program Educational Objectives:
 
The Program objectives stated above are fully consistent with the student outcome. Below, we provide a mapping of the relationship between Program Objectives and Student Outcomes. The table below shows the mapping of published Student Outcomes to program objectives.
 
Table 1. Program Educational Objectives Mapped to Student Outcomes
Program Educational Objective
Student Outcomes
Technical Skills
Professional Skills
Graduates of the Department who will use their technical and professional education to
Science /Math
Experiments
Design
Team
Problems
Ethics
Communication
Global
Learning
Contemporary
Tools
1. Work successfully in diverse careers i.e. industrial practice, academia and research.
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
f)
g)
h)
 
 
k)
2. Understand the larger context of the problems faced during their career.
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
f)
 
h)
i)
j)
k)
3. Through their professional accomplishments, enhance the reputation of ECUST.
 
b)
c)
d)
e)
f)
g)
h)
i)
j)
k)
 
Technical skills and abilities are key to success in the Chemical Engineering curriculum, and success in the curriculum is the first step towards obtaining employment or acceptance to graduate school. Grades alone are not enough and the Educational Program must teach students communication skills, or at least provide the ways and opportunity to improve these skills.
 
Finally, students must have knowledge of contemporary engineering problems as they enter in a competitive and changing engineering employment sector or as they choose graduate programs. Therefore, by the Fourth Year and at the time of graduation, Student Outcomes a) - e), h) and k) are the most important to these objectives of obtaining placement.